01December
2016
A Living Trust Primer

A living trust is a popular consideration in many estate strategy conversations, but its appropriateness will depend upon your individual needs and objectives. What is a Living Trust? A living trust is created while you are alive and funded with the assets you choose to transfer into it. The trustee (typically you) has full power to manage these assets.1 A living trust will also designate a beneficiary, or beneficiaries, much like a will, to whom the assets are structured to automatically pass upon your death. If you create a revocable living trust, you may change the terms of the trust,…

01December
2016
Get Up and Running After a Disaster

If your business is hit by a hurricane, windstorm, blizzard, or other natural disaster, or if it falls victim to arson or terrorism, you might have to close up shop for a while. As a result, you could suffer a major loss of income. Types of┬áCoverage Here are some basic types of business interruption coverage: 1. Named Perils Policies, which cover only occurrences that are specifically listed in the policy, such as fire, water damage, and vandalism. 2. All-Risk Policies, which cover all disasters unless they are specifically excluded. Typically, an all-risk policy excludes damage from earthquakes and floods, although…

01December
2016
Smart Ways to Handle Off-Site Employees

With today’s technology, many companies and their employees have figured out that at least some work can be done from home. The idea seems an ideal solution for some work-related problems. Working from home eliminates commuting time and expense, reduces day-care problems and requires less office space. But along with the benefits come some challenges: It’s more difficult to supervise off-site employees, let alone determine how much supervision they need. Managers sometimes wonder whether productivity, loyalty and morale are high. As a result, some companies are quick to embrace the concept and just as quick to abandon it, reasoning that…